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Lion, Witch And Wardrobe


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I actually liked the movie better as it solved one of my very big dislikes of the book, the VERY stilted dialogue (yes, it was written way back when but I don't remember Tolkein being so stilted).

 

But as I was watching the movie, I realized another big problemo imo. I didn't see the youngest boy (Edward??) as so bad. Ok, here is a kid in the middle of wartime; who misses dad and mom; and is lorded over by (IMO) very annoying older sibs-- know it alls and so forth. He is constantly put down by them. Then he finds Narnia and this witch just offers him comfort and sweets. I don't think he really had much of a clue that she was evil. His younger sister says he took away Thomas, but he never met this creature-- not even sure he exists. So when he goes off to find the White witch (and "betrays" his family) I was sure he was actually betraying in his own mind. He has no clue as to her nature, and doesn't know anything about this Aslan (who looks quite a bit like my cat). All he has to go on are some talking beavers and his younger sister. So I just had trouble with the whole allegorical thing--- this kid so called betrays his sibs and Jesus (Aslan) dies for his sins. I saw him as a confused, normal kid in wartime with a bunch of older bossy sibs. (OTOH, my sister coming at this from a conservative view, immediately saw him as the "bad kid". But aside from the sort of betrayal that seemed hardly like a real betrayal. I didn't see any badness. Of course if you tend to think humanity is bad basically I guess it is an easier leap.)

I also didn't see the other kids as so free of fault. The oldeenr boy was so annoying, imo, and kind of remained so throughout, softening only at the very end.

 

I wasn't as bothered by sexism as I saw it in light of the times more. The movie did deal with that in a way by making the youngest girl the most brave person in the film, imo. (Ok she didn't fight wars.)

 

BTW, my cat, as I mentioned looks so much like Aslan. I knew he was my lord (no not MY LORD). :-)

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I'll end up renting the movie when it comes out on DVD. As a teacher I try to stay on top of what is big with students. (I watched Shark Tales because a Kindergartner kept asking me if I'd seen it yet!)

 

I suspect I'll agree with your take on the younger brother. I think he is much maligned in the book. Of course he is going to want to get away from his older brother because he is being bullied! Certainly as a teacher and someone from the 21st century I will interpret things differently than was the social norm when Lewis wrote the original.

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You're lucky you work with kindergartners. I'm not quite sure if I want to stay up with what my hs kids are watching. :-) No telling. Most of them say that Harry Potter is "gay". (Current term for something they don't like.) Yesh!

 

I think you're right about the view of the times re: kids. I think it might have been a more "children should be seen and not heard times" and children were not viewed as having very serious needs of their own, but seen as little adults. A boy like the younger brother would be seen quite differently today as more a bullied, perhaps even at risk (though I didn't see his problems quite that seriously). I'm sure some portion of the population (my sister for instance) would view his behavior as more indicative of a "fallen state". (Why the older brother and sister weren't equally fallen is beyond me.) Not even sure that that was CS Lewis' theology. I haven't read any of his non-fiction.

 

I think it is a good one to see in the theater, but I don't think the special effects are THAT good-- computer animation was a bit on the crude side compared to, say, Pixar or even HP (which I think was Industrial light and Magic). (I'm really into this kind of stuff,btw. Did a little animation in college-- fun, fun, fun.)

 

 

 

--des

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You're lucky you work with kindergartners. I'm not quite sure if I want to stay up with what my hs kids are watching. :-) No telling. Most of them say that Harry Potter is "gay". (Current term for something they don't like.) Yesh!

 

Oh, I impress mine by telling them I read book 6 in one day. When they go "WOW" I tell them that is because I read a lot and the more you read the better you get at it!

 

With older kids you might get in trouble trying to stay up with them. My oldest right now are 6th graders who still think Harry Potter is cool.

 

 

 

I think you're right about the view of the times re: kids. I think it might have been a more "children should be seen and not heard times" and children were not viewed as having very serious needs of their own, but seen as little adults. A boy like the younger brother would be seen quite differently today as more a bullied, perhaps even at risk (though I didn't see his problems quite that seriously).

 

I am now wondering/thinking it might be a more British view. I'm not up at all on British culture. I'm aware of the stereotype of the stiff upper lip, though.

 

 

 

I'm sure some portion of the population (my sister for instance) would view his behavior as more indicative of a "fallen state". (Why the older brother and sister weren't equally fallen is beyond me.) Not even sure that that was CS Lewis' theology. I haven't read any of his non-fiction.

 

I've read very little of his non-fiction but you are probably right about the brother (perhaps eating the Turkish Delight is like tasting the forbidden fruit). And I think you pegged the inconsistency.

 

 

I think it is a good one to see in the theater, but I don't think the special effects are THAT good-- computer animation was a bit on the crude side compared to, say, Pixar or even HP (which I think was Industrial light and Magic). (I'm really into this kind of stuff,btw. Did a little animation in college-- fun, fun, fun.)

 

They are really promoting it on TV. I only go to the theater once or twice a year. I'll sit real close to the screen ;)

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>Oh, I impress mine by telling them I read book 6 in one day. When they go "WOW" I tell them that is because I read a lot and the more you read the better you get at it!

 

Well I wouldn't say anything about how easy reading is for me, given as how I am teaching reading to kids with reading problems (dyslexia, etc.).

 

>>With older kids you might get in trouble trying to stay up with them. My oldest right now are 6th graders who still think Harry Potter is cool.

 

Some of the kids do like HP. I talked to a kid one on one the other day and he was planning on seeing it. Likes HP. But I am not sure he would say this in front of the other kids. You know how HS kids are. I think my nephew liked it as well.

 

 

>I am now wondering/thinking it might be a more British view. I'm not up at all on British culture. I'm aware of the stereotype of the stiff upper lip, though.

 

Though HP is equally British, and you don't see this sort of thing. When kids are bullied or picked on, it is quite apparent. I think that HP is more authentic is far as how real kids actually sound and feel. CS Lewis is an idealized or described childhood. It might be perfectly British too-- on a kind of a theoretical level.

 

 

>> I'm sure some portion of the population (my sister for instance) would view his behavior as more indicative of a "fallen state". (Why the older brother and sister weren't equally fallen is beyond me.) Not even sure that that was CS Lewis' theology. I haven't read any of his non-fiction.

 

>I've read very little of his non-fiction but you are probably right about the brother (perhaps eating the Turkish Delight is like tasting the forbidden fruit). And I think you pegged the inconsistency.

 

Oh yes, the forbidden fruit. There's the allegory blaring at you so loud that you might even miss it occassionally, which I did. ;-) But funny thing about the allegory part is that his behavior doesn't really change after that. He doesn't really do a good job of plotting which one might expect after having tasted the forbidden fruit or show other signs of evil behavior. He just wants more candy ala the kid he is.

 

>They are really promoting it on TV. I only go to the theater once or twice a year. I'll sit real close to the screen ;)

 

 

They are really working for the Christian evangelical audience. And I have heard it referred to as Christian lite. :-) I think it is being billed as an alternative to HP in some communities. Too bad it isn't anywhere near as good. But it was fair. I did enjoy it. It will be interesting to see if any of these characters grow into their roles. I thought the younger kids were better than the older ones though (in acting) so I'm not sure what to think about that. In HP the kids are getting better and better thru having worked together, and also I think getting better directors.

 

 

--des

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I loved reading THE NARNIA CHRONICLES years ago and I love the movie. I think CS Lewis is one of us, a Progressive Christian. I believe the "deeper magic" is universal salvation or the abundant feast set out for all of us no strings attached. Yes, Virginia, the universe is a free lunch. Enjoy! Be glad all over! Celebrate!

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Evangelicals really like to claim Lewis as one of their own. I find it ironic that the conservative crowd were the ones pushing the movie so much. Darn Episcopalians! They are so universal.  ;)

 

I think CS Lewis is subversive in the best sense of that word. like Christ was subversive. like I try to be.

 

So, I am glad the conservative church fell for Narnia. A lot of fundamentalists may be transformed and they won't know what hit them!

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I don't personally care for CS Lewis as a person he is very sexist. I have a tough time calling him progressive. He seems to be more of a product of his culture.

 

BUt I'm willing to accept that he may have other view points that are progressive. I simply haven't seen them. I

 

f I've read his non-fiction I don't particulalrly remember it. I'm pretty sure it was articles or something short I read, but you never know. I didn't realize I had read The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe until I had finished it!

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"I think CS Lewis is subversive in the best sense of that word. like Christ was subversive. like I try to be"

 

 

Agreed Mystic!!! October - try Great Divorce or Screwtape Letters.... I don't see the sexism and I've read a lot of his stuff If you're sensitized to it, you might consider his time and culture. Most of his writing were during WWII in England. I'd focus on what he has to say though... even if he is "sexist" he had a lot of valuable thoughts!!! :>

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"I think CS Lewis is subversive in the best sense of that word. like Christ was subversive. like I try to be"

 

 

Agreed Mystic!!!  October - try Great Divorce or Screwtape Letters.... I don't see the sexism and I've read a lot of his stuff  If you're sensitized to it, you might consider his time and culture.  Most of his writing were during WWII in England.  I'd focus on what he has to say though... even if he is "sexist" he had a lot of valuable thoughts!!! :>

 

 

I'll take another look...

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Well it was interesting what they did with this sexism in the movie, and it is true the older boy fought most of the battle. But some of the more key things in the movie were brought out by the youngest character (who is female). Actually I thought she did such a terrific job of acting it might have been her doing that those points became clearer.

 

--des

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