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Old Station Of The Cross


Ani-man
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I bought this antique plaster station for a paltry $199 and it seems to have come from Covington KY region where the seller is located, it was apparently repainted years ago by A Bert A Moriconi of Covington and I'm trying to find out it's origins/history.

 

 

station-of-the-cross2.jpg

 

station-of-the-cross.jpg

 

I am also curious, who the various figures on this were to represent (besides the obvious Jesus) there are two men and four women figures.

Edited by Ani-man
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The unbearded man is St. John the Beloved (who was entrusted with Mary's care upon Christ's death).

 

The two bearded men are Joseph of Arimathea (in whose tomb our Lord was laid) and Nicodemus who was a friend of Joseph of Arimathea, and a follower of Christ after his conversation recorded in chapter 3 of St. John's Gospel.

 

The women are 1. Mary the mother of Jesus 2. Martha and 3. Mary Magdalene

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Too bad the Antiques Roadshow doesnt' come by your way. I bet you'd learn something interesting about the history. Some kind of auditor of that kind of thing, a really fine antique store (not a flea market or little hole in the wall) short of that a teacher of art history at a university, just some thoughts...

 

--des

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Too bad the Antiques Roadshow doesnt' come by your way. I bet you'd learn something interesting about the history. Some kind of auditor of that kind of thing, a really fine antique store (not a flea market or little hole in the wall) short of that a teacher of art history at a university, just some thoughts...

 

--des

 

 

Thank you Carl.

 

I'm not sure the road show would know much about this kind of art, it's so different than regular art if you know what I mean.

 

I did however locate the daughter in law of the fellow who professionally repainted this years ago and signed his name on the side. She said he passed away in 1992 and that he opened his statuary painting business in 1930 and retired around 1980

So I had a good lead there, but 13 years late and now a dead end no pun intended...

 

It might have come from a German Catholic church in his town that he repainted many statues in which was hit by lightening and burned to the ground! Several things point to that as a good possibility.

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