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New Kid In Town


bloved
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Now I've got myself singing the Eagles' song...there's a new kid in town... :)

 

Hi all. I recently found this forum through some links and look forward to making some new friends here.

 

Briefly, my religious background is conservative, evangelical, fundamental Christianity but, over the past couple of years, I have been moving more and more towards a progressive/emergent paradigm. I've read a number of books by Borg, a few by Spong, a few about the pains and joys of leaving fundamentalism, and quite a number about rediscovering God's grace.

 

I hope to make some new friends here and to continue growing in my faith as I further explore what is called "progressive Christianity."

 

Glad to be here!

 

bloved

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Welcome to you, too!

 

Question: How did you find your way out of fundamentalism? I have a new friend who is also a new Christian and showing signs of fundamentalism. I'm hoping over time she will grow into a more progressive Christian (I've directed her to Fuller Theological Seminary which I hope may move her in that direction).

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Question:  How did you find your way out of fundamentalism?  I have a new friend who is also a new Christian and showing signs of fundamentalism.  I'm hoping over time she will grow into a more progressive Christian (I've directed her to Fuller Theological Seminary which I hope may move her in that direction).

 

For me, it's been a process. The bottom line was that I didn't like who I'd become and the way I treated others. I didn't see much resemblance between Jesus as portrayed in the gospels and myself, and I knew that the goal of Christianity was to be more like God and Christ.

 

A big part of my journey was allowing the questions and doubts that had for years haunted my soul to come to the surface, to admit that they were there. Questioning was not encouraged in my religious tradition, it was blind adherence to a doctrinal statement that mattered. I came to realize that fundamentalism did not provide the 100% absolute answers that it promised and that my need for such a paradigm was self-deception on my part. We live by faith, not by unassailable answers.

 

I also did alot of reading of material by those who are on a similar journey or whose faith came from a more liberal or progressive slant. This helped me to realize that fundamentalism was not the only way to see God, Christ, myself, or others.

 

But again, this is a process for me. I don't know how far along I am in this part of my journey. I just know that, for the first time in many years, I am beginning to experience the peace and joy of being in a wild, unpredictable roller coast with God and just knowing that his love for me is all the security that I need.

 

From what I've heard, Fuller would probably be a good choice. I'm sure there are others on this board who know more about this than I. I went to a Holiness Pentecostal Bible school for one year but dropped out. :)

 

bloved

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Wow, that is a good -- and long -- article! It describes the Wheaton experience and its unique set of concerns very well. We were just in town for homecoming last weekend, as it was my ten year reunion! Anyway, I still look back on those years fondly, even though the evangelical subculture seems stranger to me every time I go back. But it was my first step outside the intellectual backwater of fundamentalism, and into a concerted effort to make rational Christian sense of the world. For that, I will always be indebted to Wheaton.

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Others made some good comments here, but I have my doubts about trying to "convert" anyone to your ideas. If she became a fundamentalist, she would no doubt try to "convert" you to her's. Why would this be any worse? I think the best thing would be to suggest different people to read that might balance her opinions out a bit. For example, to suggest she read Borg or Jim Wallis, for instance. But if she doesn't go read it then that is up to her.

 

 

--des

 

 

Welcome to you, too!

 

Question:  How did you find your way out of fundamentalism?  I have a new friend who is also a new Christian and showing signs of fundamentalism.  I'm hoping over time she will grow into a more progressive Christian (I've directed her to Fuller Theological Seminary which I hope may move her in that direction).

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I'm hoping over time she will grow into a more progressive Christian (I've directed her to Fuller Theological Seminary which I hope may move her in that direction).

Fuller? :blink: I don't think so.

 

http://www.fuller.edu/provost/aboutfuller/believe_teach.asp

 

 

She won't jump from Fundamentalist to Liberal. It is a growth process. It is easier to do it via baby steps than jumping which often seems like more of a reactionary way to grow rather than a legitimate intellectual and emotional growth that happens. Or at least that is my experince. You have to understand that currently she thinks Christians can't be psychologists, that women can't be ordained, and Halloween is evil...

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Question:  How did you find your way out of fundamentalism?  I have a new friend who is also a new Christian and showing signs of fundamentalism.  I'm hoping over time she will grow into a more progressive Christian (I've directed her to Fuller Theological Seminary which I hope may move her in that direction).

 

For me, it's been a process. The bottom line was that I didn't like who I'd become and the way I treated others. I didn't see much resemblance between Jesus as portrayed in the gospels and myself, and I knew that the goal of Christianity was to be more like God and Christ.

 

A big part of my journey was allowing the questions and doubts that had for years haunted my soul to come to the surface, to admit that they were there. Questioning was not encouraged in my religious tradition, it was blind adherence to a doctrinal statement that mattered. I came to realize that fundamentalism did not provide the 100% absolute answers that it promised and that my need for such a paradigm was self-deception on my part. We live by faith, not by unassailable answers.

 

I also did alot of reading of material by those who are on a similar journey or whose faith came from a more liberal or progressive slant. This helped me to realize that fundamentalism was not the only way to see God, Christ, myself, or others.

 

But again, this is a process for me. I don't know how far along I am in this part of my journey. I just know that, for the first time in many years, I am beginning to experience the peace and joy of being in a wild, unpredictable roller coast with God and just knowing that his love for me is all the security that I need.

 

From what I've heard, Fuller would probably be a good choice. I'm sure there are others on this board who know more about this than I. I went to a Holiness Pentecostal Bible school for one year but dropped out. :)

 

bloved

 

 

Sounds like your journey was much like mine... one step at a time ;)

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Others made some good comments here, but I have my doubts about trying to "convert" anyone to your ideas. If she became a fundamentalist, she would no doubt try to "convert" you to her's. Why would this be any worse? I think the best thing would be to suggest different people to read that might balance her opinions out a bit. For example, to suggest she read Borg or Jim Wallis, for instance. But if she doesn't go read it then that is up to her.

 

 

--des

 

 

Welcome to you, too!

 

Question:  How did you find your way out of fundamentalism?  I have a new friend who is also a new Christian and showing signs of fundamentalism.  I'm hoping over time she will grow into a more progressive Christian (I've directed her to Fuller Theological Seminary which I hope may move her in that direction).

 

Can't saying I'm trying to convert her. Just point her in the direction away from fundamentalism toward something at least more moderate (ie Fuller) She went from being a "heathen" to a fundamentalist which is fairly normal since fundamentalist are more inclined to reach out to "heathens." If our friendship continues things are going to come up because from what I"m seeing she is too intelligent to stay in the fundy way for long.

 

I don't think you can covert an ex-fundie back to fundie world, anyhow... especially not if the leaving was an intellectual pursuit.

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