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Go Bears ?


MOW
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I don't know how many of you are from the Chicago area, but I just can't get into this Super Bowl run. I don't know what the reason is , but I don't get into football like I used to.

 

Anyway, good luck them.

MOW

 

I once loved to watch pro football but totally lost interest after a favorite player of mine, Darrell Stingley of the Patriots, was paralyzed when tackled in an exhibition game. I now think the sport is too violent for my taste.

 

The halftime show at the Superbowl reveals the excesses of our culture each year as do the ads during the game. I sometimes watch the SB just to see if our culture is continuing to deteriorate. So far, it is!

Edited by mystictrek
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I once loved to watch pro football but totally lost interest after a favorite player of mine, Darrell Stingley of the Patriots, was paralyzed when tackled in an exhibition game. I now think the sport is too violent for my taste.

 

I remember the Darell Stingley incident. It is true that football is a very violent sport, even more violent than a lot of people realize. The San Francisco Chronicle did a story yesterday on those who played on the 1981 49ers. Most of the people who played on that Super Bowl championship team live daily in pain, or have otherwise serious medical problems. For example, the article says:

 

The Chronicle interviewed 30 players from the 1981 team in recent months, ranging in age from 47 to 59. Twenty of those players cope with significant physical issues today, from arthritis to chronic back pain to joint replacements. Two (including Montana) have had spinal fusion surgery, two have had knee replacements and one has had a shoulder replacement.

 

Nine players said their doctors told them they eventually will need a joint replacement. The scorecard: seven knees, one shoulder, one hip.

 

This snapshot of one championship team reflects the harsh reality for most former NFL players. Stand on the sideline during a game and you might wonder why the toll isn't worse. Television does not begin to convey the extraordinary size of pro football players, the freakish speed at which they move and the bone-rattling brutality of their collisions.

 

"When you're on the sideline, and these guys go past you, it's almost like a herd of horses," said Marc Safran, director of sports medicine at UCSF. "You feel like the ground really shakes."

 

That being said, I am a child of my culture, I guess. I haven't watched football all season, but yesterday I found myself getting caught up in the Colts-Patriots game yesterday, probably in no small part because I used to live in Indianapolis. As a spectacle, I have to say that was one of the most exciting games I've ever seen.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm going to watch it...but...yawn...I can't get excited either. Too many years of disappointment being an Illinois, Cubs, and Bears fan finally got to me about ten years ago. I'm just so tired of banging my forehead against brick walls.

But...do have fun Xian.

 

flow.... :blink:

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