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The Bottled Water Lie


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The Bottled Water Lie

By Michael Blanding, AlterNet

The corporations that sell bottled water are depleting natural resources, jacking up prices, and lying when they tell you their water is purer and tastes better than the stuff that comes out of the tap. Read more »

 

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We need to know this kind of stuff. Alternet provides vital information so often ignored or distorted by the mostly corporate-owned media.

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I could taste the difference between bottled water and tap water from this part of the country.

The water here is very alkaline, and most restaurants here put lemon in the water to hide that

fact. OTOH, I think some of the bottled water sold is nasty. I just filter my water, and I think

some of the companies are selling filtered tap water. I am not opposed to it, as long as they

aren't harming the environment. If you are out in your car in a hot day with no water and want

to get something to drink its nice to have an alternative to soda. Kids will sometimes drink bottled

water as well. Actually kids will eat anything in a small enough package! :-)

 

But I have no illusions where the stuff comes from, despite romantic sounding names.

 

BTW, the water here is actually very good from a chemical and bacterial standpoint-- better than water

in Chicago for sure, though I like the taste of Chicago water better. I don't know about the statements

about RO water. From my understanding is a proven technology and any problems are probably exceptions-- otoh RO (reverse osmosis) water is flat tasting. They have to add minerals to make

it taste better, but thousands of people have RO systems in their homes. I don't think the article

really addresses (or understands about) RO water. You can use the "waste" water from RO for

other things.

 

I think the issue of clean tap water in developing countries is a whole different concern and they shouldn't really be mixed. I also imagine bottlng water is not a major drain on the earth's resources-- there are

just too many other competitors, but where it is any drain it should be stopped.

 

 

 

--des

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I could taste the difference between bottled water and tap water from this part of the country.

The water here is very alkaline, and most restaurants here put lemon in the water to hide that

fact. OTOH, I think some of the bottled water sold is nasty. I just filter my water, and I think

some of the companies are selling filtered tap water. I am not opposed to it, as long as they

aren't harming the environment. If you are out in your car in a hot day with no water and want

to get something to drink its nice to have an alternative to soda. Kids will sometimes drink bottled

water as well. Actually kids will eat anything in a small enough package! :-)

 

But I have no illusions where the stuff comes from, despite romantic sounding names.

 

BTW, the water here is actually very good from a chemical and bacterial standpoint-- better than water

in Chicago for sure, though I like the taste of Chicago water better. I don't know about the statements

about RO water. From my understanding is a proven technology and any problems are probably exceptions-- otoh RO (reverse osmosis) water is flat tasting. They have to add minerals to make

it taste better, but thousands of people have RO systems in their homes. I don't think the article

really addresses (or understands about) RO water. You can use the "waste" water from RO for

other things.

 

I think the issue of clean tap water in developing countries is a whole different concern and they shouldn't really be mixed. I also imagine bottlng water is not a major drain on the earth's resources-- there are

just too many other competitors, but where it is any drain it should be stopped.

--des

 

I haven't come to any conclusion about bottled water versus tap water. My main concern is the corporate-owned media not dealing with this and many other issues with any depth. I do think a lot of tap water is just fine particularli if filtered and many people are spending money on bottled water which they could spend on more important things.

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Hi MT and des

 

When I was growing up ,my mother would simply pour tap water into a bottle, and put it in the refrigerator to get it cold. We would then drink that for water. I think for her generation, that grew up during the Depression , the idea buying water in a store would have been inconceivable.

 

I actually drink tap water now and it seems OK. .

 

 

MOW

Edited by MOW
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Actually funny thing about the sticking the bottle in the refrigerator, but it DOES do a great deal for

water taste and there is a reason for that. The chlorine used in water purification is disipated by

having water stand for 6-12 hours. So if you dislike tasting chlorine this does work. That also

means the cold tap water in the little bottles is going to automatically have less chlorine taste.

 

I think buying water *has* crossed generations, even into the Depression era folks. I can walk into a place

like "Wild Oats" here and see people in their 70s-80s buying water. Of course, I realize you are talking here

of middle class and higher but this does end up as saying something about how certain trends go beyond generations. I think some of it is convenience to be honest. I actually think some of the bottled waters dont' taste all that great, but will buy them when I want something cold, because I dont' drink soda or juice

too often. I think there is also a recent trend towards flavored waters (sparkling water with a hint of fruit

and sweetness-- but low carb). I think people are drinking these for health reasons.

 

I think you are seeing a bunch of cross trends-- concern about water quality; taste (this will definitely go towards flavored water); health concerns (not drinking enough water); kids drinking water vs soft drinks--if bottled; convenience; etc.

 

I think the sense of getting ripped off is there. I feel ripped off, but willl that necessarily stop me if I am hot in my car? I wonder what the everyday buying of bottled water is vs. occassional.

 

I did think the article covered a range of issues from trivial (tap water tasting the same perhaps), paying

too much for this water, big companies involved (Coca Cola -- is this really worse than Coke?), to things like water rights, use of resources, privization of water resources, etc. The taste test thing seemed

to the strongest point in the article. Not that I agreed since I think waters like Dansani taste awful.

But it left the serious issues not covered very well. Then it stuck in stuff like RO being bad and unproven.

Yep, sure Israel and feels that way since much their water is DI and RO (reclaimed from the sea).

 

--des

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