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tariki

The Questions I Ask And What I Believe

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Hi Soma, there is a passage in the Theraavada Canon where the Buddha speaks of the elephant and the various blind men. The moral of the story - at least according to Stephen Batchelor - is to reject "views". The Dharma cannot be reduced to a set of truth-claims. Only by letting go of such views will one be able to understand how dharma practice is not about being "right" or "wrong". ​Batchelor cites a zen master, who in effect said that any appropriate response to any situation in hand need not relate to some from of abstract truth, pre-conceived and "believed in".

 

For me (as I gravitated towards Buddhism) this relates to the apophatic tradition of Christianity, the "negative way", the way of "unknowing".

 

So, thinking abut it, and the other thread about hunger, an appropriate response in the moment ​may well be simply to give food to alleviate hunger. In THAT moment, it may be THAT simple.

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Some one said better to give a fishing pole instead of food. I feel my dharma is to point out the perceived inbalance causing hunger and the hunger in Christianity. It seems to be my hobby while occupying this body.

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Some one said better to give a fishing pole instead of food.

 

Yes, a fishing rod if appropriate.

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Hi Soma, there is a passage in the Theraavada Canon where the Buddha speaks of the elephant and the various blind men. The moral of the story - at least according to Stephen Batchelor - is to reject "views". The Dharma cannot be reduced to a set of truth-claims. Only by letting go of such views will one be able to understand how dharma practice is not about being "right" or "wrong". ​Batchelor cites a zen master, who in effect said that any appropriate response to any situation in hand need not relate to some from of abstract truth, pre-conceived and "believed in".

 

 

Derek,

 

From your post, i recall having a special moment from a writing ascribed to Paul in Romans of the NT which goes like this..

 

And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God.

 

I remember looking up the word "renewing" in Greek when traced back to the root word Anakaluto which means

  1. to unveil or uncover (by drawing back a veil)

This renewing of mind is not by programming with something new but rather removing the veil that is covering. Very similar to concept of removing views or preconceived concepts and opinions

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Joseph, you made me think of the episide recorded in the Gospels of the veil in the temple being ripped apart from top to bottom - this at the monent of the death of Jesus.

 

I would wish to associate this with the text "behold, I make all things new". Sadly, looking up one or two Christian sites, the ripping apart of the veil announces merely a new set of beliefs and affirmations, doctrines and creeds.

 

"All things" really do need to "new" moment by moment. Just at the mment I am digesting the life of David Jones ( see the Zen Gardens thread ) who, whie being a true "modernist" was nevertheless steeped in past cultures and traditions.......these he transformed/ transmuted according to his own experiences. Experiences that included the trenches of WW1 on the western front, shell shock and on-going depression and agoraphobia.

 

"Out of darkness light shall shine". Yes.

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I have observed that the conceived concepts I hold on to keep slapping me in the face until I let them go.

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Joseph, you made me think of the episide recorded in the Gospels of the veil in the temple being ripped apart from top to bottom - this at the monent of the death of Jesus.

 

I would wish to associate this with the text "behold, I make all things new". Sadly, looking up one or two Christian sites, the ripping apart of the veil announces merely a new set of beliefs and affirmations, doctrines and creeds.

 

"All things" really do need to "new" moment by moment. Just at the mment I am digesting the life of David Jones ( see the Zen Gardens thread ) who, whie being a true "modernist" was nevertheless steeped in past cultures and traditions.......these he transformed/ transmuted according to his own experiences. Experiences that included the trenches of WW1 on the western front, shell shock and on-going depression and agoraphobia.

 

"Out of darkness light shall shine". Yes.

 

Tariki,

 

I believe I got your point about the veil but there are volumes written by Christian theologians/authors that attempt to present the new and go beyond doctrines, creeds and static beliefs. Such authors include Baum, Hick, Macquarie, Moran, Schillebeeckz, Kung, Gray, Allison, LT Johnson and on and on. Of course the trick i to get it to the people in the pews who have neither the time or interest to do such readings.

Edited by thormas

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Tariki,

 

I believe I got your point about the veil but there are volumes written by Christian theologians/authors that attempt to present the new and go beyond doctrines, creeds and static beliefs. Such authors include Baum, Hick, Macquarie, Moran, Schillebeeckz, Kung, Gray, Allison, LT Johnson and on and on. Of course the trick i to get it to the people in the pews who have neither the time or interest to do such readings.

 

Hi Thomas, yes, my own post offered a counterpoint, drawn from the life of David Jones. There is more to renewal than merely the new, if it is genuine renewal. David Jones sought to re-present the past and its traditions. RE-present, present it anew, in his art and his poems. Each was "the thing itself" and not an attempt to represent anything. Thus, as I see it, he himself was renewed. I think the fact that many who knew him intimately described him as "childlike" holds some sort of clue. The thing is that he suffered deeply from depression, drank rather heavily at times and often gave the appearance of being a tramp, or at least unkempt. Well, there we have the "outcasts" in fellowship with Christ......or Jesus.....or whoever.

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There is more to renewal than merely the new, if it is genuine renewal. David Jones sought to re-present the past and its traditions. RE-present, present it anew, in his art and his poems.

 

I agree and have always liked the idea of re-presenting; for (some) readers, it is hearing for the first time - almost as if it were never said before.

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