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cpeterr

Question From Don Caron On 03-12-15

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I share Don' Caron's concern and have personally found helpful "Praying a New Story" by Michael Morwood. I find it a great start on writing new liturgy in a more modern understanding. I'm personally free as a congregant where a priest is less so, having a bishop to answer to. I am currently in my fourth year of EFM as a way to pull me back toward orthodoxy. My last worship for the class this year will be a short Eucharist based on Michael's writings with some modifications of my own taken from Jack's 11A sermon in Dallas last year. What a wonderful ending it had talking about Jesus's forgiving those killing him even as he was on the cross. Bearing in mind that we are at all times to see to the needs of others I shall use pre-consecrated elements so as to not offend anyone in the group.
We will however re-enact, if you will, a consecration where we all participate similar to the way the three Roman Catholic Women Priests were consecrated at the ordination I was fortunate to attend about three years ago. Long story short Michael's book is the first and only one that has moved me into an arena i has wished to enter. Perhaps others in this forum can point me toward other sources.

 

Peter

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Sorry, I'm lost. Who's Don Caron and what is his concern?

 

I'm not real strong on Catholic ways Peter, but if you're looking for books that may help you think less traditionally about Christianity, could I recommend Spong, Borg and Erhmann.

 

Cheers

Paul

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Paul

 

Don asked the question to which Bishop Spong responded in his weekly note yesterday (03-12-15).

Thanks for your suggestions to which I add John Dominic Crosson of sure.

 

Peter

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Peter I agree with you forgiveness is not weak, it is an act of strength.

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And understanding there is nothing that actually requires forgiveness, where does this sit on the strength scale?

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I think sins and our projection of right and wrong is created in our mind so a self healing from self inflicted bad feelings is good. The courage to face and forgiving misunderstandings then move on is a good practice. I would give it a 10 because it is effective with no aftereffects.

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Rom,

 

It seems to me that while it is true that in reality there is really nothing that requires forgiveness the fact remains that not everyone has yet reached that understanding. The minds conditioned entanglement with 'sins' and and as Soma said, its projection of 'right and wrong' seems to me to hold one in a type of bondage with the resulting guilt and destructive tendencies that are also in my view, self inflicted. Forgiveness of others and self is .... then a most valuable step on ones journey to freedom. I see this step as opening one up to a greater understanding that .... yes in reality, there is nothing to forgive and that understanding if understood correctly can stops the continual cycle of projected sin and the need for forgiveness in ones life.

 

In my own life, i essentially have forgiven others and myself prior to any 'perceived need' and therefor 'so to speak' walk in a continual spirit of forgiveness . (except when i go unconscious back into past conditioning :lol: )

 

Joseph

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Well said, Joseph. Usually if the act comes out of a problem in a relationship of some kind, hanging on to the anger but not for too long helps me to better understand myself, helps me set new healthy limits, and other cool things. The process of forgiveness creates this paradigm shift where I can use the act as an opportunity to grow and learn. Forgiveness for me is a process, not an instantaneous thing, and it can come and go. But I have to consciously work on it, so I don't get permanently stuck in the toxicity of anger and blame, which in the end only serves to stunt my own positive spiritual journey, not the other person's. I once read a book called "Don't Forgive Too Soon," which opened me up to the idea that there's value in giving the forgiveness cycle some time.

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Bobbie,

 

I like your "don't get permanently stuck in the toxicity of anger and blame" phrase which does seem to me to only serve to stunt ones own spiritual journey. I have found it good not to measure others. In not doing so that practice has freed me from even measuring myself and the self guilt that it entertains.

 

Joseph

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